In fact, what I did was just kind of jump ahead and start building on my own here. Sometimes I just like to work, especially when I think a part is going to be rather uninteresting to the audience, for example, trying to put together just a wooden structure like this. Those following the project would know that this top piece is just a single board. You also understand that these wooden pieces that I have right here were also single pieces of wood as well, and, as you can see from the picture in the background over there, this is actually the outside of the back box. Now I've already gone ahead and done some of the weathering here, and we can talk about that today, like if you want to age some wood and make it have a really old, patina type. Look, you can take an SOS pad or some you know, like some steel wool, take about a half a cup of apple cider, vinegar and about a half a bucket. You know two gallons of water mix that all together and let it sit for you know overnight. Then dip your wood into that solution and let it dry and after about ten minutes you'll get a really old faded weathered look. It turns out very nice now. Why didn't? I do that well, because I didn't really find out in time and to be straight forward. I could have done it, but I was excited and instead what I did was take old metal filings, some coal right, some ash and soaked the wood.

Then I went with the brush and I kind of brushed it in now. You'Ll see I didn't get in between the cracks very well and that's fine. I expect this wood to actually aged this summer when I'm, using this and getting more dirt and whatever on there. So you can see I've got paint all over me. I even did a wicked Phillips screwdriver stabbed right into the meat of my finger when I was trying to do up one of the screws, so that was fabulous yesterday, hopped around my shop, using words that I don't use on this show every dad and every worker Has been there anyway, guys I'm gon na start, adding some rust to the metal parts, and I also want to get this mounted up on the truck. So we can have a final look at how the assembly looks remember for those that have been watching or whoever has missed, maybe that there is a spare tire mounted right here. They did make this opening for the spare tire, and you can tell when you assemble it exactly what it is for there. So then, there's two screws on either side and two screws back here which basically secure that to the chassis, okay and then just using some pins to go through to the other side and eclipse put a pin up here at the front, just kind of line. Everything up like that into the right spot, and then an e clip right here off definitely could use an eclipse tool right at this moment, but my eclip tool is needlenose.

What a messy project this has been, especially working with the paint lately and reinforcing with CA glue. My fingers, of course, have turned a different color as per the hobby, though here's, where I pinched myself uncontrollably and try not to say too many curse words. Oh, I got off easy, so after everything is said and done, we are left with that. Pretty awesome, so far, I'm really liking the way this build is going, but I still see so much potential right. I need to get in there and start doing some hand. Painting and also start darkening up all these spots, for example, look at the pins on the leaf springs. Somebody commented on that yesterday and they're right. I wasn't quite finished yet these boards under here am I going to whether them or am I gon na, just let it go on. I have to rust up the hinges get in here and do some real rust work as well, and but overall, without the electronics being hooked up there. It is now speaking of rust. Here is that rust powder I showed quite some time ago. Different types of it has an adhesive in it, which is activated by water. This is actually metallic powder that will rust, it's, basically metal powder ground up finer than chalk ground up a super like a talcum powder type of thing and you add a drop of water and you can start going in now. I have never done this before, but I'm excited to see how it's gon na turn out I'm gon na take a cap full of water and a new brush I'm gon na put a couple of drops in each one here here you can have a look at The consistency once I've mixed it up, basically like baby food or otherwise, Music Applause, Music, Applause, Music, okay, so I also have some darker colors here, like a grimy gray, an ash color and some dirt brown.

This is gon na actually help me add a little bit of depth to the cup. I don't mind it being a little chunky here: that's the whole point of rust kind of eating into the metal and when you're experimenting with a paint job, why not have a little fun it's, like waiting for those old Polaroid snapshots to appear I'm really liking? What I'm seeing here, let's kind of pan back and you can have a look at what's, going on starting to get some of that gray. Grimy look going on so that means I'm definitely going to be using the gray in here, okay and then looking at this there's a lot of blue, so I could go back, but I don't want to lose. I don't want to lose my green effect in here. So we just want to rust up the door on top give it a bit more of that spackle effect: Music Applause, Music Applause, Music, Applause, Music, Applause, Music. The devil is in the detail, my friends get in there remember if this truck is super old, probably not a lot of chrome left on it. Everything is probably a shade of dirt or rust, but there could be parts that were replaced here and there, but again get in there with your paintbrush don't, be afraid to get in start splashing and doing things, because mud and dirt will splash up all over the Place and the more work you do, the better your truck will look knows: I've been working on everything else.

The gas tank has gone ahead and dried. Look at that. My friends is that a good job or what it looks like an old gas tank and really the secret was, was the gray and blue being added to the brown and the orange, and you can see other places on the truck are still drying. But really it has come quite a long way. I want to do a little bit more work on the Blues that are over here, just mix it in a little bit more, but overall, the truck is coming together quite nicely making sure to get inside the cab, because you know water always pools on the floor And these things used to have a hole, basically worn right into the floor where the the gas pedal was. We got a lot of these harvester trucks or c8 tens or whichever model a lot of these out on the prairies here on farms just sitting on display because they were used and finally, they got retired and put out to pasture okay. So here is my reference point: this is the picture on the box and really you can see the bonnet is slightly darker than the rest of the hood panels. Here, the the mirrors are folded over at all there's no dirt on the hub's. This this bumper here is perfect the headlights. This thing is ready to go to work, basically it's a brand new truck, and then you pan up here and what do you find grandpa's old farm truck that has been working there for the last 50 years? He acquired it in some poker game back in the day and he's been using it to haul hay bales.

You helped him put rocks in the back of it to help move it across the property. This thing has seen work all around the farm and granted. I had an amazing time learning how to do some of these techniques today, like what I would call the chunking method, where really I'm just going in and creating a lot of depth using different colors for rust – and you know you know, adding blues grays the Browns, The oranges a little bit more orange in there would have been great, but as we pan back, you can see a dry brush method. Where really I was trying to get at that oily affective of the corrosion dripping down over time, a scrape on the door as well as some pitting the gas tank turned out phenomenal, or should I say, the diesel tank turned out great fuel tank got to get Into the chassis under there do a little bit more work for sure it's, not as as Rusty's I'd like to be the fenders. I had to make sure took a lot of damage. You can see good paint. It'S got a lot of rock chipping on the front. The salt chipping technique that I showed in the video really helped set a good base for what I wanted to do old, dirty windows. This was important for me, so I did a lot of brushing on of just kind of that paint dust and if you notice there is the bonnet slightly darker than the actual hood panels themselves, I did paint the servo in the front.

You can't see the SAVAK servo anymore, because it was painted to match with the truck different types of rusts different colors of rust everything over the years. We can see here on top it's, even had an authentic roof scrape a few times because of the lumber. That was put into the back. I did fix the mirror on here. In fact, I modified it because, as you guys suggested, it would make it just even that more authentic and it's same with the top windshield wiper one motor worked one motor didn't quite work on the passenger side, turning it around. Yes, I did paint the tires. I want you to think about painting tires when you're doing this, that the tire is rotating. So when I, when I actually wiped the paint off first, I got made sure to get into the treads. This thing has never actually seen dirt there's, not a speck of dirt on this or rust. Obviously, but you know, when I'm wiping off the paint, I want to make sure to do it directionally. So it looks like the tire was turning and spinning in the mud. So lots of dirt underneath on the chassis here. Obviously I did a much better job on this side, those mud flaps again, not a spot of dirt on them. This is all paint, and I don't even have this back bed attached. I can remove this whole thing right now, check it out. Even all the hinges got their proper weathering dirt and everything sticking in the side beautiful.

I love how this just fits on there and you have that spare tire location right there. So I'll just pop this. On should be, can I do it one handed oh that's what she said: look at the blue and the grey that came into the wood like this looks legit I'm very happy with this. I also made sure to do inside the door to make sure we had mud. I guess I could do a lot better job, obviously, but I mean inside the door jambs again different types of rust happening, getting it down to the bare blue underneath really fun. So there you go there's a good look at the the King, Kong RC c8n and I'm gon na spin it around here. So we get a final view. I hope you guys loved this project and I'm still gon na put the electronics in myself, like I just got to hook it up and solder it and get it out on the trail, but guys go ahead, smash that like button for me right now. Let me know you're still watching, because this was a heck of a project project. A plan took lots of courage to do this. For you guys this is the most detailed paint job I've ever done. So, thank you all for the the the information you've given me all the different tips and tricks, and I just want to know like the reason I do these videos is for you guys to be inspired and to get out there and have fun with a hobby That I find just so fascinating if you guys were gon na build this same truck.

Would you do a patina build like I did, or would you make it brand new and like sparkling off the showroom floor, would you make it into a dump truck or a tow truck? Would you make it into a drag car and like put in like a our drag truck and put it in like a super brushless motor and and make it into a two wheel, fury or what let me know in the comments section down below smash that, like And we'll see you in the next episode of rcadventures now get outside and have some fun with RC.