With this first one, but if you’re just starting out, i highly recommend sticking to one specific brand, at least for a while, more specifically a brand that is either supported at your track or is popular at your track here in america. That would be something like team associated or losing when it comes to tenth scale and probably techno when it comes to eighth scale. This is part of the reason our run tombs seem associated still, parts between them are pretty much interchangeable, and this is also true with the b6 buggy as well. Even some of the new parts that came in the b6.3, you want to hear more about that. Another day, this is pretty much true through any and all brand when it comes to racing vehicles. Like i said, all the 10 scale two wheel drive cars from team associated all share the same parts, same thing with x, ray lossy schumacher, you name it as long as you have a suite of cars from the same manufacturer, you should be able to share parts Between them, in a pinch, this standardization doesn’t just extend to the car itself. It can also extend to the car’s internals running a different esc and motor combo on every one of your cars can be quite dumb. Having multiple brands via scenes mean you have to carry a bunch of different programming cards and memorize how to program them all. Personally, i recommend starting out with hobby wing, as they are usually the easiest to solder and work with most of the time, though, if you want to run something like ready or mcclan, i won’t stop you.

The only reason i wouldn’t recommend teakin to a beginner is because of the hassle of soldering up the wires to the esc itself. If you don’t know what you’re doing it can get messy very quickly. Speaking of electronics, this may seem like a given but make sure you know which motors and escs are legal for you to run in any specific class. Of course, in a novice class you can pretty much run whatever you want. A cheap plug and play esc. Motor combo will work if you just want to go but running something made for racing will give you a head start. First you’re going to need to know what kind of class you’re running. If you’re doing 10th skill race, then you’re, probably going to hit with either 2 wheel, drive buggy 2 wheel, drive short course: truck stadium truck and 4 wheel drive buggy, depending on which car you have you’re going to need a different type of motor. If you’re in a two wheel, drive buggy stock class, then you’re either gon na be running a 21.5 turn motor or a 17.5 turn motor for short course. Truck and stadium truck you’ll either be running a 17.5 turn or a 13.5 turn, and for four wheel drive you’ll, be running a 13.5 turn or 10.5 turn motor all, depending on the size of the track. Also, with all these stock classes, you’ll be running no timing. On the esc, only on the motor.

Now, if you have the choice between running a stock class or mod open class, if you’re, just starting out, always go for the stock class, if you can, if you don’t, have a choice and the class you’re running is open by default. Don’T make the mistake of overpowering both the car or yourself for two wheel: drive buggy, for example, if you’re, inexperienced or feel like you have a lead finger. Anything below thirteen point. Five turns with a bit of eseeming timing will be plenty to get over most obstacles on a tenth scale track. Eighth skill, i’m, a little bit more hazy on, but the general ideas stay the same. Yes, you can run the most powerful motor and esc that both the rules or your wallet can allow, but you may not be able to handle it. 2000 kv is plenty for me Music. Now the number one thing i see more people make mistakes on than any other is battery maintenance. Batteries are literally the life of our rc cars and, as a result, you need to take care of them. I can’t tell you how many batteries i’ve seen puffed up. Only after about a few months of use and abuse, there are a few things to know when running a lipo battery. So here are a few quick tips to know to keep your batteries healthy and working, always balance charge. Your batteries, no exceptions, never leave a fully charged battery sit for a long time.

Don’T leave them over time in a hot car. Don’T fully discharge your battery until you’re ready to throw it away. Do not disable the low voltage cutoff on your esc and when you’re, doubling them always put them in storage mode now, one new thing that’s come up recently are high voltage batteries. I shouldn’t have to state this, but make sure you do not mix up your charging modes between batteries. Never, and i mean never charge a regular lipo battery on high voltage mode. The results could be a bit yeah now. One thing i see many people obsess over is the setup of your car. Now, yes, setup is very important to how your car is going to handle, and these cars can be very sensitive to even minor adjustments. However, when i see someone spend all their time setting up their car and not driving, i get a little bit upset, especially when someone who, to put it bluntly, isn’t skilled enough for those setup, changes to matter and would spend their time better by just getting more Track time in ninety percent of your setup comes from your tires anyway. So if you’re, a novice, simply getting the right tires and getting as many laps in as possible during practice will do much more than disassembling and reassembling your diff for the third time in a day, the best time to set up your car, usually isn’t, even on Race day, it’s some time before race day.

If you know the track you’re going to which i hope that you do look up any and all setups for that specific type of track, if it’s a long, fast track with sweeping bends, look up and set up for that kind of track. Same thing. If it’s a tight technical track doing this should get you in the general ballpark of what you need for that day and you shouldn’t have to make any drastic changes unless the track makes any drastic changes. The best time to make actual setup changes would probably be some time before race day, usually a practice day. If you can take advantage of that, or maybe even about say three hours before the race actually starts, these are generally the best times when you actually want to make big setup changes to your car, not in between heats another mistake. I see a lot of people making when driving is when they overdrive their car, throwing your car way too fast in the corners not breaking in time. Getting on the power too early over jumping jumps that kind of thing this sort of aggressive driving style usually manifests when falling behind being from a crass or generally just driving, slowly i’m. Here to tell you that, where it’s okay, to push yourself, it’s, also important to know the limits of both you and your car, if you find yourself pushing way too hard or find yourself making many mistakes in a row.

Take a second to collect yourself by driving. Slowly and methodically, while slowly wrapping up the pace over time, this will give you time to collect yourself and re, evaluate position and, in general, will help you to avoid getting tilted. Speaking of which the last mistake i see, many people make in rc is not letting themselves enjoy racing. In my short time of racing i’ve seen my fair share of radios being thrown cars being broken and yelling matches being had. I at one point was one of those people who got angry and bent out of shape over every little thing. When i got back into rc, however, i had grown, and i eventually had an epiphany, bad marshalling, broken parts rubbing and racing and a plethora of other things can ruin your race day and can happen at any time at the track. You’Re, seeing right now, i was in first place for about half a lap before i went into the wall. This little ball cup popped up and the marshall who was closest to me was ain’t it unable to pop it back on. I went from first to last or twelfth and less than a lap in the a main. If i had let that get to me, i would have just left the race, but i wanted to finish still because i could so. I ran down popped. The ball cup back on and placed ninth in the end, still not fantastic but better than not finishing.

My point is these: things happen to everybody, often at the absolute worst times and there’s almost nothing. You can really do about it. Nothing except grit your teeth and do it again to see if you can do better the next time and better is exactly what i did. I managed to place second in both stadium truck and short horse truck and overall, i think it was a good day. The sooner you can accept the fact that these things happen and that there’s always the next race, the sooner you can truly enjoy racing for what it is entertainment again we are grown men and sometimes women, Music playing with toy cars, they’re supposed to be fun. It’S up to us to allow them to be fun that’s all for now. If you can think of any other mistakes, you might have made that you’d like to warn others about, feel free to put them in the comments below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keJp-g5oiSY